Airstream Time

Exploring North America in an Airstream

Posts from the ‘Hiking’ category

Juan de Fuca Provincial Park and Port Renfrew

Sunday, October 15, 2017

Martha said I got to choose what we do today. I wanted to go back to Port Renfrew where we saw people lined up on a bridge over the Gordon River. There was nowhere to park the trailer, so we couldn’t stop, but I knew there was a big salmon run. It’s only 41 miles. I knew it was a long, curvy, bouncy trip with the trailer, but thought it would be faster with just the truck. I was wrong. It’s an hour and a half trip if you don’t stop. The Road to Hana in Hawaii has nothing on this winding road, but it’s worth it.

We stopped at French Beach Provincial Park and walked down. there is a beautiful picnic area, a playground and benches along to edge of the beach. It’s a round rock beach where the waves roll the rocks back and forth, a very cool sound.

Driving on, we came to a very cool spot, Jordan River, where surfers and paddle boarders worked some small waves. A fire kept onlookers warm, but it was a nice day by now. A coffee shop sits on the other side of the road, and a small campground sits right next to the water.

We stopped at China Beach, where the Juan de Fuca Trail begins. It goes for 47km along the coast next to Juan de Fuca Straight. We hiked it for two hours to Mystic Beach and back. Of course nothing can go in a straight line on this rugged, beautiful coast, and neither does the trail. It winds up and down hills in this section, and you have to be vigilantly watching roots that go everywhere. Martha slipped on one and took a fall. It could have been nasty, but she was OK. It was Sunday and there were a lot of people on the trail, and everyone had at least one dog. One young lady was running the trail with her music plugged into her ears. I don’t know how you would run this trail! It’s cool though. You can camp along the trail or on one of the beaches.

We thought about hiking another section, but decided against it. It was a beautiful, warm day when we arrived at the Gordon River Bridge, but chilly winds blew off the ocean and up the river. This is the look of British Columbia I love. A big river surrounded by mountains thickly covered in pine trees. It still appears wild and free. There was only one fisherman on the bridge. We gazed into the water and saw four, big salmon moving upriver. It certainly wasn’t a big salmon run like there must have been on our trip down. Maybe the tide has to be right. Another fisherman worked form a kayak in the middle of the river, while a couple sat under an umbrella, soaking up the sun.

We drove into town, now hungry for lunch. Two places were closed for the season, but we stopped at The Renfrew Pub, not knowing what to expect. Motorcycles, trucks and sports cars were parked in the lot. It has to be a great trip for motorcycles. It was busy with people out for a Sunday spin on a pretty day, maybe the last for the next spell. I ordered a salmon burger and fries, and Martha had seafood chowder and fish tacos. It was all very good with good service. We walked out back of the pub and down the dock. Martha posed next to a beautiful Indian Motorcycle. There were the cutest tiny cottages right on the dock with great views and gas fires to keep you warm. I asked Martha if she wanted to stay the night, but she declined. Looking into the water, there were thousands of small fish, sardines I suspect. On the other side, we saw two large crabs. It looks like a healthy, beautiful environment.

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Just north of Port Renfrew is the end of Juan de Fuca Trail at Botanical Beach. We walked down to the beautiful, rocky beach at low tide where a small forest grows on a rock. Then we got back on the road for the long drive back. Well, it’s not a long drive, but it takes a long time.

Cowichan River Provincial Park

October 12, 2017

As Lonnie suggested, we went to three day-use areas on the Cowichan River. We were astounded by its beauty. Lonnie said it is very busy in the summer with fishermen, so it is closed to fishing now below the falls. Steelhead run the river in December after the rains come. She said the river will be up 20 feet! People will still fish it in drift boats and pontoon boats. It is also very popular with kayakers, and I can see why. At the falls, there are two fish ladders, each for different water levels. I don’t know how you would fish this when it is rocking like that. This is a gorgeous river with a lot of uses.

We drove up to the town of Cowichan, which is at the bottom of huge Lake Cowichan. We stopped at the grocery to stock up on a few things, and returned to camp to sign up for another night and get some lunch.

We went up to Marie Canyon Day Use area, another gorgeous area on this beautiful river. In its summer form the river cuts through an impressive rock canyon. No wonder kayakers love this river. What is really amazing is how the water cuts concavities  and even holes right through rocks. One rock looked like a Mickey Mouse face. This park follows the river for a long way with hiking, biking and horseback trails. The Trans-Canada Trail comes through here. It is a very well thought out park, where picnic tables and benches are tucked into secluded places.

Back at camp we enjoyed a nice fire and told each other the stories our books told. I am reading “13 Hours in Benghazi” while Martha read “Fugitive Nights” that she picked up at a visitor’s center “Need a Book” shelf. Rain drove us indoors for dinner and early book reading. It rained all night. Dick was right when he said, “ You can set your calendar to October 12th for the rains to begin”.

Rain Forest Trail, Bog Trail, Information Center, and Tofino

October 10, 2017

We had rain last night, a good thing for British Columbia. It’s also good when it comes at night. Although chilly when we set out at 9:30, it was most pleasant for a hike. The Rain Forest Trail is only 1km, the whole way covered by a beautiful wooden walkway. Whoever built this was a real craftsman. This forest is gorgeous, so pretty it took an hour to travel the short distance, and I could have taken longer.

A raven clucked softly in different tones the entire walk through this magical forest. I wish I had recorded him or her. Huge trees, one giant cedar being born in 1247! Signs educated us about the forest, plants and trees. It told us about how huge, dead trees serve as nutrient for new trees. If you see a straight line of trees, you know they grew from a fallen one. Gardens grow on tree stumps and limbs. One sign told us one very old fallen tree harbored more insects and animals than all the humans on earth. Last night’s rain brought the forest to life, and the sun was perfect for pictures. I rank this hike with one of the best I have ever hiked, along with yesterday’s Wild Pacific Trail.

True athletes that we are, we went for another 1km hike at the Bog Trail through a totally different landscape. Warnings were posted for bears and wolves, but didn’t even see a sparrow. On to the Kwisitis Information Center.  It’s a great view from the deck of the Information Center of Wickaninnish Beach. The real treat was their movie. Like everywhere else, this area was ravaged by Europeans. The salmon were fished out. Whaling had been done here for thousands of years with little effect, but with more advanced methods, the whales were soon fished out. Then lumber companies were stripping the island of age old forests. Finally the Tla-o-qui-aht had enough, and their chief made a stand. In what became standoff battle, other residents and people from other parts of Canada joined the First Nation people. The story is the question of how to make resources sustainable. Vancouver Island is an incredibly beautiful place. How do you protect it and still let your citizens make a living. This is an excellent film that should be required for all inhabitants and visitors. If anyone has a link to this film, please share it.

We went into Tofino and had lunch at The Shelter. It was excellent – great food, great waitress and great view. Thanks Brian and Leslie, for the recommendation. Then we went to the library to post and read e-mails. It’s a very small library, but steadily busy for the two hours we were there. One lady ran the show, and while I was trying to write, I couldn’t help listening to her. The way she handled people was a delight. After helping a little girl find a book and telling her all about it, the little girl turned to her mom and said, “Do we have to leave”? That’s when I started paying attention. One young lady came in with a book overdue. She was apologizing right from the start, but the lady in charge said, “What are you? Canadian? Stop apologizing”. Cracked me up. A persnickety woman was searching for some magazine and couldn’t find it. The lady in charge went over and said, “Nope, we don’t have it. We don’t have any A’s”. Others asked about a book, and the lady had comments and suggestions about all of them. I wondered if she had read every book. I couldn’t write any more, I was so mesmerized by this woman, and sorry I hadn’t paid more attention from the start. I was really sorry when it was time to leave. I went up to her and told her she was the best ever. She looked at me quizzically and said, “Are you messing with me?” I told her I wasn’t. I didn’t tell her how many libraries I had been in since July – big ones, small ones, good ones, bad ones. This one may be small, but if you want a warm, comforting atmosphere with an incredible lady running, count your blessings. I said, “No, it’s the truth. You are the best. Thank you so much”. She stared at me, wide-eyed, mouth hanging open, and hesitatingly said, “Well, thank you”.

Wild Pacific Trail

October 9, 2017

We walked the Wild Pacific Trail central section in Ucluelet. It is a beautiful trail along the rocky coast with benches to sit and admire the beauty. Eagles, blue herons, sea gulls lots of small birds inhabit the area, along with some wolves. Keep your puppies close warned a sign. There are stunning views around every bend. We took a little loop through an ancient cedar forest. I had no idea cedars could grow so big.

We cruised the little upscale town, but it is Thanksgiving holiday, so all businesses were closed. We were surprised by the number of vacation houses, hotels and resorts. Bike paths went through town, and hiking trails went along the coast. It’s a very pretty area that is probably very busy in summer.

At 52 degrees, it was a great evening to sit by a big fire. Martha made a great split pea soup and bread warmed over the fire. We walked down to the beach for sunset. It is a beautiful beach with a lot of character – rock outcropping, trees and pounding surf.

Hike Cable Bay Trail and Nanaimo River Park

Friday, October 6, 2017

We hiked two pretty trails, the Cable Bay Trail and Nanaimo River Park Trail. The highlight was seeing four River Otters in Cable Bay. Martha went down to the point to get a closer look, and they popped up right in front of her, trying to figure what she was all about. Two eagles were yelling, unable to catch a fish. Maybe they were yelling at the otters, which are very good at catching fish.

The Nanaimo River Park would be a great place to bike. The river looks like it would be fun to canoe or kayak. Back at camp, Martha fixed a great dinner of ratatouille, pork chops and mushrooms.

Hike Squirrel Cache, Bike to Ralph’s for a Milkshake

September 29, 2017

As we got ready to hike Squirrel Cache Trail, Ken and Ruth came over. We had spoken last night as they were cooking dinner because they have a new 19’ Bambi. They are from Spokane and wanted to get their new Airstream out. They knew all about the campground and the area. Previously tent campers, this is all new to them, but Ken is an avid reader of the Airstream Forum. As we stood there talking, another couple came up. They too have an Airstream, a 23’. Both couples were very nice and interesting to chat with.

The Squirrel Cache hike was an easy hike, even though we made a wrong turn somehow. I keep looking at trees with holes all through them for a baby owl to be sitting in the opening.

After lunch we rode the bikes into Bayview and Ralph’s for ice cream and WIFI. Riding the Lynx Trail over gravel, rocks and tree roots slowed things down quite a bit. It makes it interesting for a while, but we rode on the road coming back. Bayview is really a nice, little town in a beautiful setting with big mountains surrounding a beautiful lake. I ordered a double scoop chocolate cone, while Martha went for the Huckleberry milkshake. Both were outstanding. I’m going to miss Ralph’s. He is sponsoring a fishing tournament this weekend and had 78 entries.

Back at camp, Martha cooked salmon, potatoes and brussel sprouts over an open fire. She is very good at cooking this way.

Finish Hiking AT in Shenandoah National Park

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Sunday, November 20, 2016

I had seven miles to walk to Compton Overlook to meet Martha. I was sore and tired, but it felt good to be finishing the hike. It was still blowing very hard when we got up, and it was cold. The water bottles weren’t frozen, but they had ice in them. Nick was nice enough to boil me some water for coffee. We didn’t know if Kelly got the messages through the InReach, so we didn’t know if Nick’s girlfriend or Martha would be on the way to pick us up. I figured at worst I would walk or hitch to Front Royal and get a room. 

I set out at 7:30 not knowing what kind of hike I had, but I knew by now that 7 miles is a 5-hour morning for me on this trail. I had a lot of layers on as I started up the steep hill form Gravel Springs Hut figuring I would take some off when I got to the top, but I didn’t. It was cold and that wind was really blowing. The first part was pretty level and the whole day was relatively easy with a couple of mountains to go over. I flushed a couple of grouse at the top of one. That was nice to see. I haven’t seen grouse in Virginia in a long time. Trying to take pictures at the top of the first mountain, the howling wind about knocked me over. It was dangerous, so I moved on, trying to stick to the business at hand – getting to the pick-up spot in reasonable time. I stopped for a breather at one point and a tree limb fell right in front of me. All it would take is for one of these trees to give up in this fierce wind and fall on you. Thank God that didn’t happen. 

The last mountain, Compton, wasn’t so big, but by the ninth day, everything was difficult. I knew it was the last one, so that helped a lot. I was surprised to see hikers at the top. It as Sunday, so I knew people would be out, but it was also cold and nasty with that wind. More hikers passed me on the way down the other side. Someone was bringing a group of community kids up the mountain for a hike, one having a Superman backpack. I shook his hand, congratulating him for hiking up this mountain. Cute kid!

It was difficult to control my pace as I got closer. I wanted to go faster, but you always know that one bad step and there goes a knee or an ankle of a pulled muscle. Every day I felt something sore. Of course the feet are always sore, one way or another, and I had plenty of blisters. Today I felt like I could pull a muscle behind my left knee, the top of the calf muscle. 

I got to the parking lot just after 12:00, but Martha wasn’t there. I had 3 bars on my phone, but couldn’t make a phone call. I could see that she got my message to pick me up, and she replied at 10:15 that she would soon be on the way. I knew that would take about three hours to get here. It was cold standing there in that wind. I drank more icy water in wind that kept wanting to blow my hat into Never Never Land. I took out my rain jacket and put it on for another layer. I didn’t want to take out my long john pants and put them on in the parking lot. People were coming and going, and there were probably 10 cars in the parking lot. I was impressed there were so many out on a tough day like this. It was 29 degrees and blowing gale-force winds. I didn’t see Nick anywhere, and hoped he had gotten through to his girlfriend. 

I walked down the side of the road a couple of hundred yards to keep moving and try to stay warm and also see if I could get cell reception, but that was no use. Even if I got through on mine, what were the odds that hers would have reception? I figured 1:30 was a good target, so I kept walking, once considering getting the sleeping bag out. It might look foolish, but it would be warm! Sure enough at 1:30 I saw that beautiful truck round the bend! It was so good to see Martha! She had a big thermos of hot tea that really hit the spot! 

I requested lunch at Skyland for lunch, although I wasn’t really hungry. I had eaten an energy bar while I waited, but I wanted to drink a lot of something and I wanted that split pea soup! I drank half of the tea on the way. Never having seen this part of the parkway,  we enjoyed spectacular views. It was interesting to drive back past all the places I had walked. It seemed like a long time ago as we went back. Nine days. It’s pretty amazing how far you can walk in nine days! 

When we got to Skyland, it was 28 degrees with a fierce wind. Martha scurried across the parking lot into the building. I didn’t have any scurry in me. No split pea soup so we ordered chicken and rice, which was the best ever, with big chunks of chicken. It was almost like a chicken pot pie without the shell, a meal all in itself. Martha ordered a wedge salad, which was great, and I had the fish and chips, stuffing myself. It’s worth the trip up here just for the soups!

Driving back along the parkway, I wound back the clock, seeing all the places I had crossed days before. It was a lot of mountains to slog over. I think Mary’s Rock was the most difficult, both going up and coming back down. It’s steep with a lot of rocks. On the other hand, I had met a couple from Culpeper who love this hike and come regularly. 

I’m glad I did it. I was sure tired and worn out. No doubt it would be a lot easier for a young person. 10 miles a day is an all-day job for me. I learned a lot, and saw places I have never seen. I feel more comfortable in the woods alone. I know more about how to get water and appreciate it a lot more. There are places I want to come back to with Martha, and I’d like to camp at the campgrounds. I have huge respect for through hikers who spend months on the trail. I can’t even comprehend spending four months hiking the whole thing! Then again, if I were 25 years old, I’d be very tempted. We have a great national park in our back yard. It needs our help. They are understaffed and underfunded, and it is tremendously porous. You can fish any stream with a fishing license on hundreds of miles of trout streams. You can hike hundreds of trails from the bottom and not pay a dime. The only way they get a fee is if you drive the parkway, and you can get a lifetime senior pass to ALL the national parks for $10. You can stay in these shelters for free!  Canada would not let you get away with this, and therefore their parks are in much better shape. 

Day 8 on the At, Pass Mountain to Gravel Springs Hut

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Saturday, November 19, 2016

It wasn’t as hard as some other days, but it was long – 13 miles. Sweating all morning, by the time I rested at the top of Hogback Mountain, a front was coming through. Nick had taken a long break at Elkwallow Wayside, and he caught up with me at the top. Neither of us liked the front coming, although people had told him it was just going to be wind. We met again at a spring, and you could feel the cold air coming over the top of the ridge, so we pressed on. Nick left me in the dust. By the time I got to Gravel Springs Hut, I was whupped again. It was a 13-mile day and I felt it. Two guys were getting water from the spring as I passed, but they said there was good water flow. As I got to the hut, two guys were sitting on the roof enjoying the sunset. Nick was building the fire and welcomed me to camp. “Well big time at Gravel Springs on Saturday night”, I said. 

The two guys, Matt and Phil were in their fourth year at the Naval Academy. Matt was from Maine and Phil was from Kentucky. They had just come for the weekend, hiking in about seven miles. Matt has hiked through the park a couple of times and likes to come back to this hut when he can. He asked us where we were getting picked up. Nick and I both thought we had one more day and a half, but Matt said we would be out of the park in seven miles, and then the trail went through boring private property from there. Otherwise, you walk the parkway to Front Royal. The wind was blowing up a gale now, and it was cold. I put on my long johns and ate some Thai chicken for dinner. Freezing, I crawled into my sleeping bag to keep warm and stretch out. 

Nice guys, Matt and Phil told stories of how the Academy sent them to some very interesting places during their summers. Matt was going to go on nuclear submarine duty after graduation, while Phil was going to be a marine. They were set up to sleep in Hennessy Hammocks, which they swore by. I am going to have to check that out. Thank God for guys like these to do tough jobs for our country. It was fun spending an evening with them. It was also very fun to think tomorrow would be our last day. The wind was howling and it was very cold. So much for the perfect weather week.

Day 7 on the AT, Skyland to Pass Mountain Hut

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Friday, November 18, 2016

Mostly, it was a beautiful hike today. I ate an early lunch at Pinnacles Picnic Area. It’s a luxury to sit at a picnic table and eat. A couple of hours later, I stopped at Bird’s Nest 3, a day-use shelter. Just as I was getting ready to go, a truck drove up and a young ranger got out. A nice young man named Andrew with a quick smile, he had come to clean the shelter and the privy. He is from Chicago and seemed quite happy with his job and living in quarters by the horse barn. The park is lucky to have such a nice young man. I packed up, wished him well and headed down the trail. I didn’t go far before seeing a post saying there was a spring 500 yards to the right….straight down the mountain on the road Andrew had driven up. Now appreciating the value of every drop of water, I headed down the grassy road. It was a nice spring with great water flow. As I finished filling the bottles, Andrew drove past with a wave. Getting back up to the trail was steep, and I was sweating by the time I got there, but you just have to do it!

Another hour and I started the climb up Mary’s Rock, which is a very technical and difficult trail, mostly because of the steepness and all the rocks. You had to pick every step going up and going down. It was Friday and there were a lot of people on the trail all of a sudden. Weekend!  I wasn’t really prepared, or even thinking about it. I passed a few people at the top. Then coming down, there was a group of older women, who were tired and taking a rest. With tennis shoes, no backpacks, not enough water and no food, they were spent. I encouraged them as I passed, cautioning them to take it slowly. Then I cautioned myself. One bad step and game over! I slowed and shortened my stride, choosing ever step. It takes discipline and a bit of fear. I could make it home now. I could see the finish line ahead. The only thing that could stop me was an injury. Slowly, methodically, I made my way down Mary’s Rock. Close to the bottom, a couple was heading up at 2:30 with some kind of terrier dog that didn’t really want to go. He asked how far it is to the top. I told him a long way, and it’s difficult. Don’t get caught in the dark. They had nothing. No pack. No light. No food and no water. I don’t know why there aren’t more problems. 

As I got to Pass Mountain Hut, a couple was coming out. They had never come this way, but wanted to see the shelter. From Culpeper, they love this hike up Mary’s Rock,and do it quite often to see the sun set, especially on a Friday night. This time, they went the other direction to the hut, a more gentle hike. I was tired standing there with my pack on, but  they were very nice and I enjoyed the conversation. After a bit, we said our goodbyes and they headed back. I unloaded my pack and built a fire. I was startled by something coming down the trail. It was a young man named Nick. He was tired and soon put his pad against the front wall of the hut and sat on it. After exchanging pleasantries, he said he had left his map a mile back where he crossed the road. I let him look at mine, but soon enough he said he was going to run back and get his! “It’s only a mile. I’ll be back in an hour”, he said. I settled in, made my bed, filled the water bottles right behind the hut, and got something to eat. I hung my food up and put my pack in the locker. By then Nick returned, a bit tired and stressed. There had been bears along the way, and it was dark. I watched him fix his dinner with a gas stove. Cutting up garlic, onions, carrots and sautéing them, he added some spices from a small bottle. Then he added rice and dried chicken. It smelled divine. He is a plumber in northern Virginia, but also knows carpentry and other handy trades. He loves to climb, and would love to do some outdoor climbing. It’s his first trip on the trail, and he started Sunday where I started. He said we must be traveling the same speed. Well, I don’t think so, but we’re ending up at the same place at the end of the day. 

After some nice conversation, I climbed into bed to stretch out while he cleaned the dishes and put his stuff away. Then he settled into the upper left side. I was soon asleep, but was awakened by a strange thumping on the wall. I tried to imagine what could cause such a sound. Trees? No, Bears? No. Then Nick got up and walked around the hut. I thought he was looking for what caused such a noise, but he was looking for campsites. The next morning I would find out the mice drove him out. He said they were running all around the wall, and he saw big spiders as well, so he felt he would sleep better in his tent, and he did. He camped at a site along the creek fed by the spring. All night he heard footsteps in the leaves as animals came to the creek to get water. Bears, deer or both, and then maybe others, but that was OK. Didn’t bother him at all. 

We had a nice talk in the morning as I got ready. I told him to come right past me and don’t feel like you have to wait for me or walk with me. I’m too slow. He agreed, saying he would relax a bit before he got started. Nice guy, Nick. Rather like my Godson, Hunter. They would surely make good friends. 

Day 6 on the AT, Rock Springs to Skyland

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Thursday, November 17, 2016

It’s not far to Skyland, and it really wasn’t a hard hike, but I was worn down. It took me all morning. As I approached, a lovely voice said, “Stay the night!” Huh? “Stay the night. Get some rest.” Great idea! I’m in! I walked down to the lodge and went into the restaurant building, not knowing where to go. I asked a nice-looking young man where I check into a room. He just looked at me, with a big pack on my back, unshaven for six days, older than dirt and exhausted. He didn’t say a word, but motioned to follow him, taking me back out the door, up the steps and across to the Administrative room, opening the door for me. I patted him on the arm that felt like a lineman for the Packers, and said thank you. He just nodded and went on. I wanted to hug him! 

Ever wonder how it possibly takes so long at the airport when you check in? What can they possible be typing? This was the case with the lady checking me in. A large man waited patiently beside her. After what seemed like 20 minutes, she gave me a key. I had asked for the cheapest room, and it was a hike to get there. Fortunately it was all down hill, across from the Conference Center and playground. I never knew this was here. I sat down, barely able to function and called Martha. Fortunately she picked up. I told her I had a room at Skyland, and she could come if she wanted, but I knew she had other things to do. She asked me what I needed, and I gave her a long list. She told me to take a nap and she would be up later. 

Since there was no laundry, I put all my dirty clothes in the bathtub and put Dawn soap and water in it. Then I took a shower, stomping the dirty laundry like I was smashing grapes to make wine. I shaved, put on my second set of clothes and hung the wet clothes all over the deck. Surely the neighbors would love this! Now I had to wind my way back up the path to the dining room and get some lunch. 

I can’t remember her name. Maybe it was Rita, but she was the best! She could see I was tired and hungry. I ordered a Pepsi, split pea soup and the Everything Omelet. Rita filled my Pepsi glass every time I drank it dry. It really settled my stomach, but I’ve gotta tell you, the split pea soup saved my life! I couldn’t eat the whole omlet – only half, and there was a fruit cup that I took with me. I thanked Rita and headed back down the hill. I laid down, but couldn’t sleep. I heard footsteps in the leaves below. Sure it was a bear, I had to get up and check. It was a lady walking slowly along the edge of the grass and leaves. 

Martha got there about 5:30 with two bags. Long johns, pink gloves, a hat, and a complete restock of food. Too wonderful! I could never have made it without her doing this. There was nothing useful in the store – just tourist stuff. Someone later told me they usually have it, but since the season was over, they didn’t restock. 

We drove up to the restaurant for dinner. Another very nice lady waited on us. More split pea soup please, and I’ll try the blackberry lemonade. Both were wonderful. Martha had shrimp, and I ordered trout with rice and something else. Same deal. I kept guzzling that blackberry lemonade, and she kept bringing it. Surely I was dehydrated. I managed to eat the excellent trout and a little rice, but couldn’t manage anything else, but that was more than I had eaten in the last four days combined. 

I was stuffed and tired and fell asleep soon after getting in bed. They have great beds and quilts, so I left the door cracked for some fresh air. The heat system is a bit antiquated, but far better than a hut! At 5:00 in the morning there was a loud growl and Martha screaming about something in the room! Turning on the light, I fully expected to see a bear, but nothing was there. I quickly shut the door. She said it was in her bed, so we tore back the sheets. She said, “there it is!” A baby mouse ran along the wall, scared to death. I reopened the door, and he was quite happy to get the hell out of there. Laughing and relieved, we laid back down. 

She had to go play tennis, and I knew I had to hit the trail. I thought it would be an easy day, but when I looked at the map, it wasn’t. Driving me to where I had gotten off the trail, I thanked her profusely for coming all this way. I could not have made if she hadn’t. I had no way to restock my supplies. I thanked he profusely! She said something about go get ‘em. Finish it! I was happy for the encouragement, the support and the love.