Airstream Time

Exploring North America in an Airstream

Hurricane Dorian

Saturday, September 7, 2019

Wunderground showed Hurricane Dorian on track to come right over us with winds to 60 mph and a lot of rain. We had a couple of hours before it started, so we showered and did laundry in the nice Peaceful River Campground. Don came by to say he was going to the hospital to see his wife and would be back by 12:00. 

By 9:00 it started raining with some wind, and it built up all day. By mid-afternoon it was blowing and raining hard. If this is 60mph, I don’t want to be in 160mph winds. Later I would learn it was equivalent to a category 2 with 90mph winds. Ralph, the campground owner’s father, stopped by to see if we were OK, then asked if we wanted a couple of pieces of apple pie his wife had baked. Well sure! “Anything else you need?” We asked if he had orange juice, and he did. In short order he drove his car right up to the trailer, bringing apple pie and orange juice. He saw our two leaks with pots underneath and said, “We’ll fix those tomorrow. I have some good stuff that will work.”

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We spent the day reading books and checking the weather. Martha watched a movie. We are plugged into power, but it went out about mid-day. Fortunately, the batteries were fully-charged, and I was amazed to see we were getting a little solar (1-2 amps) during this storm. The danger with a trailer in a storm is a tree coming down. We were in a good spot clear of trees and power lines. We were lucky to be pointed into the wind. There was no doubt – I owe Martha desert.

Nova Scotia

Friday, September 6, 2019

At 9:30 the ferry docked in Nova Scotia and we lined up at the stairwell to head back to our vehicles. Turning one way on our deck, we didn’t find the truck and trailer, so we turned around and went to the other side. Once we found it, I was surprised how quickly we were off. Now, where were we going? Martha had entered Pictou Provincial park, but it took a little bit to find us. It was about a 4-hour drive, located near the ferry to Prince Edward Island.

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Overlook along TCH

Pulling into the campground, an RV pulling out waved to us, so I stopped and backed up. He said they were closing for the hurricane. Really! He was more worried about his house in Norfolk. “Norfolk, Virginia?” I asked. Small world once again.

We pulled up to the window, and sure enough, all provincial parks in Nova Scotia were closing. The storm wasn’t even coming until Saturday morning, if it comes at all. We pulled into a day use parking area, fixed lunch and explored our options. The weather report had the storm coming right over us with about 4 inches of rain and high winds.

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Caribou Monrose Provincial Park

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Caribou Monrose Provincial Park, too bad we missed it!

We considered going 3 hours into New Brunswick, but the predictions were actually worse there, the eye of the storm being less damaging. We found Peaceful River Campground a bit inland, with hookups and an open field where trees might not be a problem. We drove 30 minutes, seemingly in the middle of nowhere to find the campground.

Don checked us in. His wife was in the hospital with a gall bladder infection. This is a seasonal campground where everyone knows everyone. They had all been calling him to move their furniture inside and close their awnings. He took us to the campsite and guided us in, then started talking to the neighbors. Of course it was all about the storm. I had taken what I thought was a map of the campground, which it was, but it listed all the names of the seasonal campers. Jim and Sandra were our neighbors, but they were preparing things here before returning home to do the same at home.

Don said, “Aw hurricanes never come here. They hit the Caledonia Mountain and turn out to sea.” We talked about where we had been and going to PEI after the storm. Martha said she wasn’t taking the ferry, as it might be too rough. Don said they often close the 10-mile bridge when the winds are high. Geez! I’d rather be on a ferry!

They told us about a cute little town, Tatamagouche, where nothing has changed for 40 years. Don said the population in summer was 5,000, but in winter 110. We decided to go check it out. I was on 1/8 of a tank of gas, so I stopped on the edge of town to fill it up. People were in line, but fortunately the diesel pump was open. In Newfoundland I had to use the pin number to pump gas, but here I didn’t.

People kept lining up as an attendant talked to a guy in front of us whose license read “volunteer firefighter”. He was also filling a plastic gas can. The attendant said the grocery store running out of everything. Really?

Driving by Foodland, the parking lot was full. The little town sits on Tatamagouche Bay on the north side of Nova Scotia and faces Northumberland Straight between PEI and Nova Scotia. The little main street was busy. A brewery was filled with people on the side deck with sample flights of beer. We went in and ordered a couple of porters, which were good.

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The brewery sink!

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There were several restaurants on the street. We opted for the Chowder House Cafe. It’s a small place and was pretty full. Three young ladies were busy filling orders, running back to the kitchen and taking payments. Martha ordered a mussel appetizer and a salad. I ordered halibut with mashed potatoes and mixed vegetables. The mussels had sriracha on them, which mad them a little hot. There were also strong onions. It was good, but kind of takes away from the mussel flavor. Other than that, everything was good.

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I couldn’t help but wonder where these young ladies were from. There was Guatemalan coffee for sale in the corner, so maybe that was it. Wherever they were from, they were doing a great job.

On the way out of town we saw a sign for Creamery Street with an ice cream place on the corner. Ahhh, maybe tomorrow, if the hurricane doesn’t come. At the gas station, people were still lined up. Many were filling multiple portable gas tanks, probably for generators if the power goes out. I bet Martha a desert it would turn out to sea.

Argentia Ferry to North Sydney, Nova Scotia

Thursday, September 5, 2019

We were taking a 16-hour ferry ride over to Nova Scotia. The winds were blowing about 20 mph, and we were both a bit nervous about getting sick. It leaves at 5:00 pm and arrives at 9:00 am, so we bought a 2-bunk berth, but since there weren’t any, they gave us a 4-berth. The idea was to get some dinner and sleep through most of the trip.

We wanted to get out and do something, so Martha found a hike nearby. Argentia is a WWII US Navy base that was turned back over to Newfoundland, so there are gravel roads going everywhere. A sign pointing to a trail head took us up a narrow gravel road. One point made me grip the steering wheel and hold my breath. It was very narrow with a dropoff on the left where a creek ran under the road. I was just looking down at the creek when the right wheel went into a deep pothole. I about had a heart attack, thinking we were going over. 

We parked and walked up to find a big pond, probably used for fresh water for the base. There were several nice campsites and fire rings where people probably came to fish. A boardwalk led up the small mountain, so we followed it to a smaller gravel road winding through the woods. Blueberries lined the road, so we stopped to pick some, using my hat for a bucket. 

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Further up the road, a mountain biker passed us, saying there were lots of blueberries at the top. There were two forks in the gravel road, so we made mental notes of where to turn. After more blueberry picking, we saw a tall lookout spot at the top of the hill. 

Climbing up, we were rewarded with a wonderful view of the east side of the Burin Peninsula. Mountain islands emerged from the huge Placentia Bay in beautiful blue green waters. The sun peeked through the fog to show all the colors. 

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In the other direction we saw our huge ferry getting ready for the trip. Straight across was a huge oil project being built with hundreds of cars parked in a big lot. Obviously, our campground was busy because of these workers. I would discover this is the West White Rose project, a well head platform and piping infrastructure for offshore oil and gas industry. It is being built by Husky Energy and employs 700-800 workers.

Back at camp, we got cleaned up, hooked up and went down the hill to get in line for the ferry. They asked us if we had fruits and vegetables, which surprised us. We sat in our lane and waited for an hour before loading started. I’m always a bit nervous loading, even though I have done it many times. Keep your eye on the loader in front of you, get in your lane and never take your eyes off the loader until he tells you to stop. Then try and remember where you are. It will all look different when you come back down the stairs. What deck are you on? We were on G3. Which side, front or back?. Then you can’t see around huge tractor-trailers and campers. It would be nice if they had numbers up high from front to back, but this one didn’t. When all else fails, push the door lock on your key fob and see if you can recognize your car horn.

The strategy others followed going upstairs was to first find a prime seat in the lounge. Of course it helps if you have been on the boat before. We went to our cabin on the 8th floor first. We were surprised at how nice it was, with nice bunk beds, bathroom and shower. 

There were plenty of seats in a circular lounge with a bar, a game room and a small setup for a two-person music performance, which was quite entertaining. There were three options for dining, making it feel like a cruise ship. There was a little rocking as the ship got going, but not bad. People hit the bar pretty hard with beer the primary drink. We had dinner at the buffet, which was good, except I always eat too much at a buffet.

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We went up to the room and read books before falling asleep. In the middle of the night the waters got rough. I could hear and feel the  ship rising and crashing over big waves. We were probably in the main channel of the St. Lawrence. I dared not move, lying on my back, listening to Martha snore. By 6:00 am it became pretty calm again, so we got up, showered and went down for coffee and a muffin. We could see Nova Scotia in the distance. People-watching was entertaining. The Newfies were the ones in shorts and t-shirts.

Cape St. Mary’s Ecological Reserve

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

Driving the Cape Shore of the Avalon Peninsula is beautiful. This leg of the Peninsula sits up on a plateau, with bays cut in, usually with a beautiful river leading in. It is a prairie, and I expected to see caribou, but never did. I envisioned fishing these beautiful streams for trout. 

It rained very hard last night with heavy winds, so this morning we drove in and out of fog. It’s about an hour and a half drive to the cape, partly because of poor road conditions. that makes it hard to enjoy the scenery. You have to dodge serious potholes and ice heaves. When we made the turn toward the reserve, the road got better, but narrow. I stopped several times to let cars pass. There were fences, and you could see something was grazing these vast grasslands.

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We parked at the visitor’s center in fog, but could see a lighthouse at the end of the point. Entering a ranger began telling us all about the reserve. It is mostly about a special breeding area for gannets, murres and other sea birds. I asked about the fences, but no cows. He said years ago, the government encouraged people to raise pigs, but wanted to keep them out of sight and smell. They regulated that there should be a buffer from the road, like a tree line, or hill. Farmers don’t raise cattle like we do in the states. The winters are too hard, so it is more for personal use. They might have 1 or 2 cows. Someone might have 20, and they are allowed to bring them here to graze in the summer. Hay and grain have to be shipped in for winter feeding, so it is expensive. 

The fog began to lift, so he encouraged us to go out while we could see. I thought the sun would burn it off, but we would learn it just comes and goes. A big wind will drive it off, but there was little wind this morning. He cautioned us the stay within the staked areas, as the cliffs are 800’ above the ocean. The fog makes it difficult to see where you are sometimes. Bird Rock is only 40’ from the viewing area, a 10’ x 20’ rocky ledge.

 

I went to the truck and got two cameras. Walking through beautiful fields of grass and flowers, it is about a 20 minute walk out to the rock. The fog was thick enough that I could hear birds, but couldn’t see them. As we got to the viewing area, a german couple was sitting on rocks, amazed at thousands of gannets raising almost grown, speckled babies. Lots were sitting on the 800’ tall rock with ledges all around and all the way down. There was constant action of birds circling around, out to sea and back with fish for the babies.

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The fog made it more surreal with birds floating above a seemingly endless cavern. I wanted to lean over to see, but one bad step and you are finished with this lifetime. I love that Canada doesn’t put guard rails everywhere to protect you. They just put up signs to use at your own risk.

The german couple had just arrived for a trip all the way across Canada, and they were amazed at the sights before them. The man was totally unafraid of heights with his feet dangling over the side, taking pictures with his point-and-shoot camera.

We really could never quite see the water below us, but I love shooting in the fog. It makes things stand out from its background. Birds were doing their little love dance, rubbing their bills up in the air, or wrapping their heads around each other. Apparently different birds roost at different levels. Gannets take the top, murres lower and so on, but we couldn’t see far enough down to tell.

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We talked, traded places and shot lots of pictures for about an hour before walking back. Like the puffin viewing area, I would love to go back. We ate our lunch while watching a 30-minute video in the visitor’s center. One local has become a sort of ambassador for the area. He walks the entire reserve often, and he talked about the different plants and flowers he sees. 

A local lady made a sort of aquarium, using things she found on the beaches, carving them into cod, lobsters, trash, a boat and a fisherman. It is a wonderful area. Like the ambassador, it would be fun to walk through it, as well as viewing the birds in all seasons – well maybe not winter. 

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Driving back up the coastal road, we stopped to take pictures of several unique areas. We are here in the summer, when it is often foggy or cloudy. The winters will be more gray and white, so the like to make color any way they can. They also have lots of time in winter to do crafts. One homeowner had built or bought boats of all types to decorate his yard, and even a Trump airplane. Another homeowner made very cool birdhouses. Then I had to stop and get pictures of a classic-looking trout stream.

Placentia/Plaisance

Tuesday, September 3, 2019

Taking our time at Bellevue Beach on a blustery day, we washed clothes and caught up on some things. It’s only a 1-hour drive to Argentia, where we will catch the ferry to Nova Scotia Thursday. On our way out, we stopped to say goodbye to a couple we had met with a 1972 Airstream Argosy in great condition. 

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Martha read a brochure on Placentia, next to Argentia. I had called Sunset RV Park in Argentia about 7 times with no answer, and there is no website. It looks like a parking lot for ferry travelers. When we got there, a nice man checked us in. All the spaces were booked, but we could use the unserviced overflow area for $15/night. We picked a relatively secluded spot near a cute, little Evasion trailer from Quebec. Later a cool o’neiro pulled in between us.

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It’s one of those times I am happy to have solar. Despite my constant tinkering with solar, we have only plugged into electric July 20 and September 2. We pay attention to what we use, but we watch TV, play movies, cook in the oven for short periods, run the fans and lights. It really has done well in a land where the sun doesn’t shine regularly.

We went down to Placentia and drove around. It’s a cute little town with a spectacular harbor, and two rivers. We drove up to National Historic Monument, Castle Hill. It is where the French built a complex fort in 1693. Bill was at the desk and I thought had a great analogy. He said the fishing resources were incredible here. It was full of cod and salmon ran up the rivers. Cod was a resource like oil is today. Countries would go to war over it. It was impressive the amount of cod that were caught, preserved with salt, then stacked and sent to Europe. The French would raid St. Johns from time to time. By 1713, the French gave up their right to settle Newfoundland. 

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Today it is a cool site with great views of the town and harbors. Trails run from one end of the fort remains to the other. It is well-maintained and quite pretty. The visitor’s center is a good one, explaining the design of the fort as well as the history.

We went to Three Sisters for dinner, which was OK.

Chance Cove’s Coastal Trail

Monday, September 2, 2019

On Madeline’s recommendation, as well as All Trails’ 5 star rating, we took a short drive to Chance Cove to hike the Coastal Trail. It seems like every cove we visit is beautiful. There are similarities, yet differences. We watched as fishermen cleaned their catch on the docks. On a holiday weekend, lots of trucks were parked at the dock. They had their own barachois (lagoon), bordered by a rocky or sand barrier to the sea.

It’s a big parking lot at the trailhead, but there was not the usual sign. Later we would find it at the driveway entrance. We asked three ladies where it goes and how long it is. They had shirts for Iceberg Beer and Dildo beer, so Martha was interested. She had just bought Iceberg Beer and liked it. The ladies said, “You MUST go to Dildo!”

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The trail winds through the woods for 20 minutes. It is well-maintained with walkways and signs. I tried to imagine who would do all this work. As we came out into the open where a pretty peninsula stretched out into the bay, we stopped to talk to a man, a woman and two teenage girls. While Martha talked to the woman, I talked to the man. One of the advertisements for Newfoundland said to stop and listen to the stories Newfoundlanders tell, and we have learned to do that. They were from town. “Chance Cove?” I asked. “No, St. John’s”, he said. Commenting that it was a lovely day, he said, “Every day’s a lovely day, if you put your feet on the ground”. 

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I guessed his age to be 59 or 60. He was a postal worker, but recently began forgetting his regular boxes. Since his mother and two brothers suffer from dementia, he went to get checked, and sure enough, he has it. A handsome, healthy man, it is sad. But they were enjoying a nice hike on a beautiful day. 

They went on, and we walked out the little peninsula and met another couple. The man asked if we would like our picture taken, so we did. Then we began talking. Quite a character, he asked where we had been, suggesting all kinds of things we had missed. He suggested taking the ferry over to PEI, then drive the length and drive off when we were done. 

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Funny how these things go. We kept bumping into these two couples along the trail, and would see the first couple again in Dildo. Winding up and around the cliff, signs pointed to several gorgeous beaches with crystal clear water. Several small islands lent character to the beaches, one having caves running through them. It was a bright, sunny, warm day. Several people went into the water for a swim. I mean it looks like a South Pacific beach, but I’m quite sure the water is cold. The second couple we talked to climbed down the rope to the beach. He was a scuba diver and wasted no time shedding clothes and going for a swim. I was surprised his pretty Newfoundland/Labrador retriever didn’t go in with him. He had told us he does the Polar Bear Plunge in St. John’s when it was -12C, so this is nothing. 

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I think there were three of these gorgeous beaches before looping around for the return. We have hiked some spectacular hikes, and I would add this one to the favorites list. 

Bellevue Beach Campground

Sunday, September 1, 2019

Before leaving Frenchman’s Cove Provincial Park, we took a little walk over to the golf course that is such a big attraction here. This is a very nice park with a great staff, and now I see the biggest attraction – this very nice golf course.

Driving back up the Burin peninsula is so pretty, with its alpine lakes, hills, trees combined with open grasslands that appear to be manageable to travel by foot or horseback. It’s Labour Day weekend in Canada, so we saw cars parked along the highway, or by a bridge or gravel road. Some might be picking blackberries, some were likely fishing while some were 4-wheeling with their ATVs.

We pulled over next to a bridge and down a short gravel road beside a pretty stream. A big camper was parked there, but its truck was gone. We ate our lunch by that pretty stream. Surely there were fish if this guy camped here. 

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It was early afternoon when we pulled into Bellevue Beach Campground. We knew nothing about it, except it wasn’t a provincial park, our usual preference. Being a holiday weekend, it was packed. Every site was taken, and then there were visitors with extra cars and trucks. The sites weren’t well-marked, so I was stopped, looking to see if I was in the right place. A man jumped up and pointed, visually asking if this was our spot. I nodded, and he quickly moved his truck.

It was a tight fit. Kids were riding their bikes. People were walking down the gravel road, and Beatles music played from a boom box next to our site. I started to back in, but got out to see where two little kids were on my right front where the front of the truck will swing. They waved and then moved their bikes. The man who moved his truck came up asking if I would like some help. Yes I would, thank you. As I backed in, it looked like the right, front of the truck might clip a trailer parked across the driveway. I was in the spot, but crooked, crowding the site next to me. The guy with the truck suggested pulling forward across the drive. I did, but I told him I was worried about clipping the trailer. He stood on that corner, directing me until I was perfectly straight, then gave me the thumbs up. The owner of the trailer looked relieved. 

The Beetles player site welcomed us, asking where we were from. Five of them were sitting in a circle, enjoying a perfect day at the beach, sipping beer and soaking up the sun. They were from St. John’s and came for the long weekend. Still hooked up, I glanced around at the rocky beach. People were swimming, walking the beach, while behind us a baseball game was going on in a nice, grassy field. 

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Finally, we got set up and took a walk up the beach, then up to a grassy area on the hill. Martha pointed out the whole field was wild strawberries. They are an early season berry and were no more. We saw that it was a natural barachois that probably was breached at high tide. To the north were big, dramatic cliffs. A day use area bordered this beach.

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Back at our site, Martha went next door to ask about hiking trails and where the showers were. I was sitting inside and noticed the husband was packing up. He was the one who guided me into our site. “Was it something I said?” I asked through the screen. “No, it’s where you’re from”, he said with a smile. We talked through the screen for quite a while. They are from Cupid, next to Brigus, 50 minutes away, and were leaving to go see their children and grandchildren in Alberta in a few days. They planned to stay longer, but got to thinking about all the things they needed to do. He was recovering from esophageal cancer, and was doing well, but still didn’t have his energy. He talked about where we might go in our last few days here. They go to Venice, Florida in the winter, usually flying, but now considered driving down. They have a friend who goes to Bradenton Beach, where they also visit.

I gave him my card and told him to come see us in Charlottesville on his way down. Then he invited us in for a drink. They had just bought this 25’ trailer, and it was quite spacious inside with all kinds of storage. His wife Madeline had been giving Martha all the scoop on where to hike tomorrow. We had a nice, long visit. Funny how you just hit it off with people sometimes. Next door was quite a party. Paul said he couldn’t leave until they finished up. It was a group from nearby Dildo. They invited 25 friends with a big buffet dinner while their husbands played music. It made for nice background music. Finally, they finished playing, so we let Paul and Madeline get packed up.

We fixed a nice dinner backed right up to the beach, watching everyone enjoying the holiday weekend.

Burin, NL and Long Range Trail

Saturday, August 31, 2019

FrenchmanÕs Cove barachois

Frenchman’s Cove Barechois

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Garnish harbor

Our plan was to visit the museum in Burin, go to Marysville to grocery shop, come home for lunch, then hike Long Ridge Trail. The glitch was that Burin and the surrounding bays were so spectacular, we might have explored it all day.

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After some searching, we found the Burin Museum housed in an old bank. Our tour guide, Jean, did a great job of showing us the history of Burin. There have been some tragedies, one being a very unusual Tsunami in 1929 that did tremendous damage. It was a bustling village in its heyday, with shops and shipping all over the world. Times changed, and it is a quiet, relatively undiscovered area. 

We went to an overlook of the bay and town for a great view. We looked for Cook’s Lookout trail, but never could find it. It was past lunchtime and we were a bit grumpy. We stopped at Extreme Pita for a nice lunch. Two young ladies were working hard in a labor-intensive restaurant, cooking, taking orders and payments and working the drive-through. I gave the truck a quick wash after lunch and filled with gas for tomorrows move.

After grocery shopping at Sobey’s in Marysville, we went into the liquor store next door. Trudy Humphries asked us if we needed help. In Newfoundland, the liquor stores are very nice, and they have a rover to help people make decisions. Trudy was very cool and knowledgeable. Martha asked about beers, so Trudy told her about Iceberg beer, made with water harvest from icebergs. Well, we had to try that. Then Martha asked about Seaweed Gin she liked at a restaurant in Trinity. That led to the iconic square bottle they use and all the quite different flavors, like rhubarb vodka, which I tried, and a mushroom rum. Then Trudy said “Don’t get me started on wine. That’s my specialty.” I was so tempted, but we had already bought more than we came for.

We returned to Frenchman’s Cove, put everything away and drove to nearby Garnish to hike their Long Ridge Trail. There was little information about it and nothing on the sign about how far it was. It starts by a cemetery and runs along a ridge above the town. The first part was a bit unkept, but got better as we went along. there are steps and boardwalks in muddy areas. Blueberries are in full form now, so we picked a half sandwich bag full. There were plenty to pick all along the trail. 

There are great views at the tops of several hills. On one side is Garnish, with its Garnish River running through it. On the other is Frenchman’s Cove with its beautiful barachois, or a coastal lagoon separated from the sea by a sandbar. To the north is a lush, green valley. Four days is just enough time to learn something about a place, but there are always things left unexplored.

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Back at camp we cooked Salmon on the fire and beets. 

The guys working this provincial park have been so nice. I have been paying an entry fee every day for every park we have been in. The guys here called their headquarters, got me a refund for this park’s entry fee and got me a seasonal pass. You might say this is what they should do, but I would argue it is exceptional. Anyone else along the way could have done the same, but they didn’t. I am taking the boys a bottle of wine on my way out.

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Chamber Cove Trail

Friday, August 30, 2019

It was a blustery, cloudy day when we set out. Driving to the south end of the Burin Peninsula, we hiked to Chamber Cove Trail. It starts out crossing a pretty stream, then up a gravel road. Raspberries grew all along the road. We paused several times to pick and eat some. There were some blueberries also, but not a lot. Up, over and down the hill to the coast we walked to the first of a number of signs.

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This is the site of a February, 1942 wreck of the USS Truxton and Polux warships during a terrible winter storm. As we walked along the cliffs, we learned about the tragedy along with the heroes of the days. 18 year-old Ed Bergeron made it to shore with two others in a boat. They found a fisherman’s shack, a good sign there may be help nearby. Bergeron was the only one capable of traveling in the snow, but he trudged along the cliff to a lead mine, where people were working. He got there just as they were changing shifts, so people were above ground. They immediately went to help.

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The ships were breaking up against the rocks. The miners lowered themselves down the cliff with ropes to rescue those they could. In time, word got to the nearby towns of Lawn and St. Lawrence came to help. Women came out to help wash survivors covered in oil that spilled into the cove. they built fires to keep them warm and brought clothes. Many were carried to a make-shift hospital in St. Lawrence. The Iron Springs Mine Dry House served as a temporary first aid station. 203 sailors perished, but 183 were saved. In 1954 the US Navy build a hospital in St. Lawrence in gratitude for their work. Years later Newfoundlanders would come to the rescue of others in Gander.

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On this day, the winds blew 20 mph and it was cool, about 60 degrees, and the seas were rough. I wouldn’t go in that water today. I can’t even imagine in February, 1942! But if you wanted to live on that day, you had to dive into the frigid water with fierce waves crashing against the rocks. Then it started to rain pretty hard, so we made our way back to the car, the way Ed Bergeron walked.

We had a nice lunch, inside the truck, at a nearby beach, watching gannets dive like rockets for fish. Driving back out, we noticed a bunch of raspberries, so we stopped to pick a half bottleful. 

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Now with a pouring-down rain, we headed back to camp. We had left windows open, and we have been dealing with a leak in our wounded roof. A little water had come in a couple of windows, but not bad, and the roof had not leaked:} Luckily, it cleared up long enough to cook dinner on the Cobb Grill.

The Boot Loop

Thursday, August 29, 2019

I was nervous about rescheduling the Ferry back to Nova Scotia. Would we be able to change leaving from Port aux Basque to Argentia? It’s a big drive from where we are back to Port Aux Basque, but it’s a 16-hour, more expensive ferry ride from Argentia, and it could be a long trip if it’s rough. Would there be a 2-berth cabin available so we could sleep?

All lines were busy. We were booking for the 5th of September, after Labour Day, so I suppose lots of people have to get back by then. Finally my call went through and Stella answered. Within three minutes, we were done. They didn’t have a 2-berth, but could give me a 4-berth for the same price and wait list us for a 2-berth. Done! Wonderful!

Then I called to book two nights at Bellevue Campground. William asked for my information, and I could understand everything he said. However, when he heard I was from Virginia, he went into a heavy brogue, none of which I could understand. After three tries he said, “The Waltons!” He loves to watch the TV show, and watched an episode last night. “Can’t wait to meetcha Mr. Wall”, he said as we finished the booking. 

We set out for a drive around “The Boot”, a loop around the end of the Burin Peninsula. This peninsula is similar to the others, yet very different. It still has the beautiful ponds, but with a prairie-like look, with more mountains and hills to give it character. It looks like a place you could ride a horse forever. You expect to see a herd of buffalo, but there is nothing. People pick a spot and plant a vegetable garden, out in the open. In Virginia, the deer would pick it clean, but there are no deer, and I guess Moose don’t care about it. Although rabbits are here, we haven’t seen any.

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Driftwood artwork

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Good resting place in Lord’s Cove

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Our plan was to drive to Nan and Pop’s Shop in Lord’s Cove for lunch and then work our back. We should have called, as it is only open certain days and times, which is the way to survive in sparsely populated areas. Driving back to Fortune, we had a nice lunch at Doc’s.  Cecilie was our waitress. I ordered cod, vegetables and mashed potatoes. Martha asked if he chili was good. Cecilie said, “I think it’s good, but then I am prejudiced. I make it.” They had a discussion on how she makes it. You have to be versatile here. She is owner, cook, waitress and cashier, all with a beautiful smile on her face.

We drove out to Fortune Head Ecological Reserve where more fossils are found in the rocks. Headed back to camp, we drove to Grand Beach, and it was a big one. The more we explore, the more we appreciate Fisherman’s Cove and Garnish.

Grand Beach

Grand Beach

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Fortune Head Lighthouse