Airstream Time

Exploring North America in an Airstream

Day 5 on the AT, Bearfence Hut to Rock Spring Hut

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Wednesday, November 16, 2016

I felt like I was getting somewhere now. I had crossed Rt. 33 and was headed to Big Meadows, a place I was familiar with. I climbed up Bearfence Mountain that had a great overlook. There was a loop trail there, but I wasn’t sure where it led, and I didn’t want to climb anything unnecessary today. At the bottom of this great rock formation, I took a few pictures and thought I should keep moving. A scream broke the total silence, “YAHOO!!!!!” I stopped and looked all around, but didn’t see anything until the second yell, “YIPPEE!!!!” Then I saw the tall hiker on top of the rock with his through-pack on his back. I asked how the view was, and he said, “Magnificent! It’s a bit of a tricky climb, but so worth it!” “Well enjoy your beautiful day” I said, and he replied “How can you not?” His great enthusiasm brought a smile to my face and gave me some energy. So cool! I think the picture is the signature picture of the trip, and I will remember his enthusiasm forever.

I was still slogging along, pitiful as it was, but the trail was very pretty today, especially around Big Meadows, which is certainly one of my favorite parts of the trail. I saw a lot of deer and was in my mode when a young lady passed me like she was in a Mercedes, walking sticks in each hand. She wasn’t wearing a big pack, but something smaller. We exchanged pleasantries as she passed. Sheez! I caught up to her at a spring where she was eating some lunch. As I filled my bottles, I told her how I couldn’t eat much. Katy was her name, and she is day-hiking this part of the trail to complete the entire AT. She had started at Harper’s Ferry and gone the distance through Maine. Later she had done the southern part, and now this section. She took on part time jobs on farms to pay the way and support herself, and now she was thinking about the Pacific Coast Trail. She said it is normal that you can’t eat the first week. Then the second week, you are ravenous and your legs get stronger. I don’t think I was going to find out, but at least I knew it was normal. Katy said she would park her car and hike the day, hitching a ride back to her car. She said she never had a problem hitching a ride. They are going your direction anyway. On her giant hike, she would hike into towns to restock her food and get a good meal, then hitch back. I thought I was brave, out here all by myself in the woods for nine days. I was awed by the mental courage as well as physical strength she had to have. 

I set off ahead, stopping shortly to hear something I have never heard before. An old buck growled at a doe in front of him, apparently getting the best of the acorns. He was telling her to move on. Katie went by as it all unfolded. I slogged on, looking up to see her looking at something in the woods. I hurried ahead as quietly as I could. A pretty black bear was eating his way through the woods. He could not have cared less that we were 60 yards away watching. After a time, we went on, Katie at an entirely different pace. It was a pleasure meeting her, and I appreciated her reassurance and encouragement. 

As I walked around the back of Big Meadows, it was quiet, closed for the season, but one man was cleaning up. Behind the campground, another man was taking notes, probably of things that needed to be done for next season. I made it to Rock Springs Hut just as the sun set. Again I had the place to myself, and I loved it. The spring was running well, so I refilled my water bottles and started a fire. There was a bear locker at the last hut and this one, which is nice. You don’t worry so much about something getting into your bag looking for a crumb. I took a quick look at the map, seeing that I would pass Skyland tomorrow. It was very encouraging to feel like I was making progress. I was on the back side of the map, and I might make it. I knew I was tired though, and wearing down. Should I take a shower at Skyland, get a good meal, wash clothes?  Could I take that much time? I was getting low on food and needed to restock, and had a list of things I needed. The first night camping with the bear family, I had lost my headlight, a ball cap and a pair of gloves. My best flashlight was now dead, but I had a backup. 

Cell phone coverage was getting worse. It was more difficult to let Martha know where I was. I was using the InReach by Garmin, but it didn’t always get a satellite signal either. Most of these huts are down in a hollow where there is a spring. I recharged my phone with a battery/flashlight I bought at Batteries Plus, but now this was my only flashlight, so I didn’t want to use it all up, so I used it sparingly. 

There was a PATC (Potomac Appalachian Trail Club) cabin close to the hut, so I checked it out. I have looked at a couple of others, and they are very cool. The Potomac Appalachian Trail Club owns these and manages them. They maintain the AT, and I’m sure use these as they are working. Others can rent them as available, so I am going to check that out. It doesn’t have full hookups, so it might not be Martha’s cup of tea, but who knows. Maybe just one night? 

Am I going to have these huts to myself the rest of the way? Probably not, but I did like it. I crawled into my sleeping bag on the upper right side and felt right at home. I wasn’t cold, so why were my legs jumping? Thankfully they weren’t cramping, although sometimes when I stretched, they would cramp up for a minute. Put mustard on the list. Maybe a whole bottle. One spoonful of mustard will instantly put my leg cramps at rest, a tip I got from my great assistant, Pam. Top foods with high potassium that are not easily portable on a trip like this: avacado, sweet potato, coconut water, yogurt and acorn squash. Top portable foods high in potassium: apricots, mushrooms and white beans. I don’t know what you do with white beans, but apricots might be good. They have lots of sugar, which you also need on this kind of hike. 

5 Responses to “Day 5 on the AT, Bearfence Hut to Rock Spring Hut”

  1. edbrownfield

    Love reading your blog about hiking the AT! It brings back memories of staying in the huts in my Boy Scout days…….long time ago but still wonderful memories. Enjoy the solitude of hiking and walking in the woods.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  2. Greg

    Thanks Ed. It was really fun and I learned a lot, gaining tremendous respect for so many through-hikers. I don’t think I will ever drive the parkway without extra water and food in case some through-hiker needs some.

    Like

    Reply
  3. Jane Ashley Skinner

    Glad to know you aren’t sick. I was getting worried about you not having an appetite. Have you read Wild or seen the movie? You must.

    Like

    Reply
  4. Greg

    That’s a great story and a great book. It’s so hard to comprehend anyone making that hike, but even more so for a woman to be out there alone for so long. I thought I was doing well for 9 days!

    Like

    Reply

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