Canoncito Trail/Arroyo Seco, NM

Tuesday, August 30, 2022

A lady in one of the shops had recommended the Canoncito Trail just outside Arroyo Seco. It’s a bit strange because it goes across private property, and you have to pay $10/person. That’s unusual, but I understand the problem. For one thing, there is very limited parking. People will also leave trash, bottles, clothing and other things, so someone has to go and clean up. I’m sure it got to the neighborhood’s nerves, so the $10 deters some people. But, hey, I never thought I would pay to go trout fishing.

Field of sunflowers leading to Sangre De Cristo Mountains

The trail follows a very small stream that you must cross a number of times. Someone has put down logs and rocks to cross this 4-inch deep stream so no one gets their feet wet. Being a trout fisherman, I have said many times – it is much safer to get your feet wet than trying to balance yourself on slippery rocks and logs. 

On the fifth crossing I was looking down at the logs as I pulled myself to land, holding onto a pine tree. Well, a broken snag of a limb jabbed me on the top of my head. It hurt a bunch, and I quickly started bleeding, well, like a stuck pig. I kept pressure on it with a bandana while muttering a few expletives. Martha took a look and said, “Oh my!” 

As the pain subsided, I left the bandana on my head and put my hat over it. I realized it would have been a lot worse if I hadn’t been wearing a hat. We continued the hike, but I walked through the water at every crossing the rest of the way. This is one of the 16 reasons to carry a bandana:

  1. Wipe sweat
  2. Clean up blood
  3. Blow your nose
  4. Sweatband
  5. Make a sling for a broken or hurt arm
  6. Tourniquet
  7. Neck gaiter to protect from old or sun
  8. Pot holder
  9. Dry your hands after washing
  10. Mark a trail or trout stream
  11. Emergency coffee filter
  12. Clean your glasses
  13. Padding under straps
  14. Lens cover if you lose yours
  15. Make an ice pack
  16. Tie brightly colored bandana to tools or people to keep track of them

It was a nice hike. I guess there are some pretty views further on, but we didn’t make it that far. Back at the truck, I pulled out the emergency kit and we cleaned up the wound,

We drove down the road to Arroyo Seco and explored the shops. We had a very nice lunch at the Sol Food Cafe. Next door they had an excellent, little grocery that was packed with all kinds of good stuff. In a small town like this, people came in steadily. There are a lot of artists in the area. One Art Gallery in particular had an impressive collection from many artists. They also had a unique approach to selling art. We have some incredible art on this trip, but how many things can you buy? This gallery turns the art into very nice greeting cards. Arroyo Seco is one of my favorite places of the trip.

Further down the road, we went to the Millicent Rogers Museum. From the brochure: “The Millicent Rogers Museum was founded in 1956 by Millicent Rogers’ youngest son, Paul Peralta-Ramos, as a lasting tribute to his mother. Born in 1902, she originally hailed from New York high society and was the granddaughter of Henry Huttleston Rogers, the cofounder of Standard Oil Company. Millicent came to Taos in 1947 and immediately fell in love with the rich Native American and Hispanic traditions of northern New Mexico. A philanthropist and life-long collector of fine art and antiques, she began to focus on the variety of arts unique to the Southwest and developed relationships with the local craftspeople, artisans and cultural communities. Millicent’s own creativity flourished in Taos as reflected in the merging of southwest cultural design elements within her own creations. The collection that Millicent developed became the core of the Museum’s exhibitions after her son, Paul, donated it upon the Museum’s founding.”

She had rheumatic fever as a child and suffered multiple heart attacks and pneumonia. Her left arm became debilitated. She died in 1953. She was known for unique style, her own fashion designs and for designing jewelry.

  3 comments for “Canoncito Trail/Arroyo Seco, NM

  1. Wilmina Sydnor
    September 28, 2022 at 6:55 pm

    The Millicent Rogers Museum was one of the best places I visited many years ago. I’ve loved tagging along with you and Martha on your adventures.

  2. September 28, 2022 at 7:10 pm

    I agree. She had quite a collection, and her story is amazing. Not everyone can wear that big jewelry, but she sure did.

    • Wilmina Sydnor
      September 28, 2022 at 7:13 pm

      And it was such an unexpected surprised when I came across it many years ago. I’ve loved tagging along with you and Martha – and very happy to not have to climb all these ancient walls with you!

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